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Trailhead

From East Concord and Shaker Road, turn left onto Hoit Road.  There will be a clearing on your right, which is an old home site. The trail to the marsh is in front of you.

From Mountain Road (Route 132), take Hoit Road east. Pass Hoit Road Marsh and start up the rise. The open area on the left marks the trailhead.  The trail to Snap Town Road is on the south side of Hoit Road.

Description

The Hoit Marsh Trail has 2 small loops about 0.65 miles long. The loops are very easy and mostly flat. The direct Hoit Marsh Trail is an accessible trail leading to a viewing platform of the marsh.

The Snap Town Road trail: is 0.8 miles long with moderate hiking with a steady climb uphill.

Other Information

History:

This property was conveyed to the City of Concord in the will of Paul Riley with the condition that the real estate be used as conservation open space.

This area of Concord was known as “Snap Town.” No one is sure how it got its name. One story has it that a man by the name of Blanchard had a habit of snapping his eyes or winking quickly. Another is that an early settler thought that others moving in within a half-mile of his residence were crowding him. He became cross or “snappish.”

Hoit Marsh is owned and managed by the NH Fish and Game Department. This is a great wildlife area, particularly in the spring and fall when the birds are migrating.

Please do not hike on the Snap Town Road past the City’s trail, as the road at that point is private property.

There is evidence throughout the Snap Town Road area of wildlife, including deer, coyote, raccoon, and moose.

City of Concord

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Nearby Geocaches

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Check for nearby geocaches to Riley Trails.

Leave No Trace Principle

Leave What You Find

Avoid the introduction or transport of non-native species. Use local firewood from within 50 miles and clean, drain, and dry water equipment when moving between water bodies.