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Trailhead

A small parking area and kiosk are located on South Road in North Hampton right near the intersection with Boutilier Lane and the Rye Town Line.

Description

All the trails are wooded with extensive wetlands bordering both the east and west side. From the parking area, the yellow trail leads north into an open area that was used as a log landing and small sand pit. The trail junctions are just north of that open area. The trails are relatively flat with easy terrain.

  • The red trail goes west along the edge of a wetland and wooded swamp that was once an open meadow drained by North Brook. There is a large vernal pool just north of the red trail as the trail swings east to join the orange trail.
  • The yellow trail follows an old pathway that at one time connected Independence Farm on Washington Road in Rye to North Road in North Hampton. Independence Farm is privately owned land that is conserved with a conservation easement held by the Town of Rye.
  • The blue trail is the easterly loop of the trail network. The color should be a reminder that blueberry picking is best along this trail and in the wetlands just off trail.

Other Information

Charles Rand purchased this property in 1947 from the owners of what is now Independence Farm. His goal was to own a personal woodlot, separate from the family business of Rand Lumber Company. Charles had a deep connection to this land and his love of this place was passed on to his son Chuck. Father and son spent hours walking under towering white pines and past red maple swamps, picking blueberries, and observing wildlife. The family consistently managed the land for the long term, with wildlife habitat and a high-quality forest as top goals. When Charles passed away in 1997, his wife Nancy inherited the land and continued its good stewardship. Her eventual desire was for son Chuck to own it and sustain the family’s long history as stewards of this forest. Tragically, Chuck died in 2013 after succumbing to cancer.

Nancy, and her daughter-in-law Sandy, decided to honor their loved ones by ensuring this land would remain undeveloped by gifting it to the Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire (SELT) in 2014. To support the stewardship of this land, more than 100 community members contributed funds for its long-term management. Now, thanks to the Rand’s generosity and the community support, generations of children and families can enjoy these beautiful woods.

  • Leave no trace. Please carry out what you carry in.
  • Respect the privacy of our neighbors.
  • Stay on marked trails.
  • Hunting is allowed. Be aware of hunting seasons.
  • Dogs are welcome, but must remain under the control of owners. Please carry a leash, leash any aggressive dogs, and pick up after your pet.
  • The following uses are not permitted:
    • Camping
    • Fires
    • Target shooting
    • Trapping
    • Wheeled motorized vehicles

Trail Manager

The Southeast Land Trust of New Hampshire is a membership-based, non-profit whose mission is to protect and sustain the significant lands in our communities for clean water, outdoor recreation, fresh food, wildlife, and healthy forests. SELT works in the 52 communities of southeastern New Hampshire to voluntarily conserve special places for the public benefit through conservation easements and ownerships. Once land is conserved, SELT ensures the conservation goals are met through our landowner easement stewardship program and through sustainable management of SELT-owned lands. Join as a member or volunteer today!

Visit SELT online for more information, or contact:

Southeast Land Trust
6 Center Street
Exeter, NH 03833
Phone: 603.778.6088
info@seltnh.org

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Nearby Geocaches

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Check for nearby geocaches to Charles E. Rand Memorial Forest.

Leave No Trace Principle

Plan Ahead and Prepare

Know your limits – it’s okay to turn back. Your home is the ultimate destination, not the summit.